Both graduate and undergraduate students have the opportunity to participate in research within the program. We routinely conduct industry-sponsored research involving listening tests and subjective audio systems evaluation, and other recent projects have involed a variety of applied audio research in the areas of machine listening, content evaluation, audio codec design, audio controllers, sound synthesis, and source separation. Below is a partial listing of several ongoing projects.

Medical Applications of Audio

  • Bennett, C. L., R. McNeer, and C. Leider. 2011. “Urgency Analysis of Audible Alarms in the Operating Room.”  Proceedings of the 2011 International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference. Coral Gables: University of Miami, pp. 771–776.
  • Bennett, C. L., R. McNeer, and C. Leider. 2011. “Urgency Mismatch of IEC Medical Audible Alarms.” Am. Soc. Anesthesiologists Ann. Meet. Chicago, IL: ASA A-1173, 15–19 Oct 2011.

Personalized Tools to Enhance Musical Creativity

Funded by a two-year multidisciplinary grant from the National Science Foundation awarded to the MuE program and colleagues from Northwestern University, the PTEMC project attempts to create tools for musicians that are accessible and useful in musical, rather than technical, terms.

  • Mattek, A., M. Freeman, and E. Humphrey. 2010. “Revisiting Cagean Composition Methology with a Modern Computational Implementation.” Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, Sydney, Australia. New York: Association for Computing Machinery.  Available online.
  • Twin Prime Conjecture for B-flat clarinet and interactive electronics (Arthur Campbell, clarinet; Colby Leider, electronics), concert at the Segal Theater, New York City (March 27)
  • O’Keefe, P., and C. Leider. 2009. “Audio Effect Control via Head-Position Estimation.” Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Haptics and Audio Interaction Design, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
  • Leider, C., D. Mann, D. Plazas, M. Battaglia, and R. Draper. 2009. “The elBo and footPad: Toward Personalized Hardware for Audio Manipulation.” Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, Carnegie Mellon University.New York: Association for Computing Machinery.
  • Leider, C. 2009. “Progress Report: Personalized Tools to Enhance Musical Creativity.” National Science Foundation CreativeIT Conference, Arlington, Virginia, January 16.
  • Leider, C. 2009. “Personalized Tools to Enhance Musical Creativity.” Invited talk, University of Florida, Gainesville, March 19.
  • Leider, C. 2007. “Multichannel Audio in Electroacoustic Music: An Aesthetic and Technical Research Agenda.” Proceedings of the 2007 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo, Beijing, July 5. New York: Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

Linking Personalized Audio and Fitness

Throughout history, physical activity and music have shared a unique bond. From the earliest forms of dance to the sea shanties and work songs of the last several centuries, motion has been meaningfully tied to music. Now, with the advent of small sensor technology, affordable microprocessors and ubiquitous digital media, it is possible to explore movement, music, and the relationship that exists between the two.

  • Humphrey, E., and C. Leider. 2009. “The Navi Activity Monitor: On Using Kinematic Data to Humanize Computer Music.” Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression. New York: Association for Computing Machinery.
  • Leider, C., and K. H. Burns. “The Water Moves: An Interactive Installation for Children.” Third Practice 2009 Festival, University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia, November 7.

Long-Term Documentation of Acoustic Environments

Thanks to an internal grant from the University of Miami, we are beginning to study the acoustic environments of a number of soundscapes around South Florida, including the Florida Everglades. Centered around a new custom audio recorder capable of recording for extended durations (on the order of months), our work includes the gathering of long-duration soundscapes, followed by their archiving and analysis.  In particular, we are documenting the dynamics of noise pollution around the Miami-Dade Urban Development boundary and creating archival data for use by biologists, anthropologists, and others interested in the Florida Everglades. In Spring 2010, we are offering a special course devoted to this effort, MMI 593: Computational Acoustic Ecology.

  • Leider, C., D. Mann, and D. P. Dickinson. 2010. “Wireless Multisensor Monitoring of the Florida Everglades: A Pilot Project.” Proceedings of the 129th Annual Audio Engineering Society Convention.  New York: Audio Engineering Society, paper 8186.
  • Leider, C., and K. H. Burns. 2009. “Acoustic Documentary as Music Composition: Two Recent Case Studies.” Proceedings of the World Forum on Acoustic Ecology 2009. Mexico City: Fonoteca Naccional.
  • Leider, C., and K. H. Burns. The Water Moves. Third Practice 2009 Festival, University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia, November 7; SEAMUS 2010 Festival, University of Miami, January 22.
  • Leider, C., and K. H. Burns. 2007. “The Sound Recordist as Composer: Practical and Aesthetic Concerns.” Proceedings of the Workshop on Computer Music and Technology 2007, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan University, March 24–25.
  • Leider, C., and K. H. Burns. 2007. “Multichannel Field Recording as Music Composition.” 2007 National Conference of the Society for Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States, Iowa State University of Science and Technology, March 8.
  • Leider, C., and K. H. Burns. 2006. “Practical and Aesthetic Considerations of Multichannel Field Recording: A Case Study.” Proceedings of the 2006 International Computer Music Conference, New Orleans. San Francisco: International Computer Music Association.

Audio Programming Using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs)

Thanks to the generosity of NVIDIA, we are currently building a personal supercomputer built around their Tesla architecture. This machine will assist faculty and graduate students in a number of projects, including computationally intensive audio tasks such as real-time solving of ordinary differential equations for analog audio circuit modeling, music information retrieval of very long sound files, and audio effects processing.

Novel Audio Controllers

For centuries, music and engineering have naturally found a meeting place in the design and construction of new musical instruments. Our recent work includes controllers based on bagpipe and accordion paradigms, along with a multitouch table and a wireless 5-degree-of-freedom sensor for acoustic musical instruments.

  • Leider, C., M. J. Freeman, P. O’Keefe, S. Molfetta, and M. Montag. “An Economical Multi-Touch Table for Interactive Applications.” Poster presented at the 2009 University of Miami Innovation Technology Showcase, Four Seasons Hotel Miami, November 18-19.
  • Leider, C., D. Mann, D. Plazas, M. Battaglia, and R. Draper. 2009. “The elBo and footPad: Toward Personalized Hardware for Audio Manipulation.” Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, Carnegie Mellon University.New York: Association for Computing Machinery.
  • Leider, C. 2009. Twin Prime Conjecture for B-flat clarinet and laptop, commissioned by Arthur Campbell. Premiere performance at the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts, Grand Rapids; additional performances at the Third Practice Festival 2009 and forthcoming at Dartmouth, NYU, and Miami. The composition uses sensor technology and software developed by undergraduate students Pat O’Keefe and Mark Freeman.
  • Kirk, T., and C. Leider. 2007. “The FrankenPipe: A Novel Bagpipe Controller.” Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, New York, June 6–10. New York: Association for Computing Machinery.

Audio Analysis, Synthesis, and Retrieval

  • Santoro, C., and C. Cheng. 2009.  “Multiple F0 Estimation in the Transform Domain”. Proceedings of the 10th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference, Kobe, Japan.
  • De l’Etoile, S., and C. Leider. 2009. “Acoustic Parameters of Infant-Directed Singing in Mothers with Depressive Symptoms.” Paper presented at the 2009 Annual Conference of the American Music Therapy Association, San Diego, November 13.
  • Cano, E., and C. Cheng. 2009. “Melody Line Detection and Source Separation in Classical Saxophone Recordings.” Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Digital Audio Effects, Como, Italy, September 4.
  • Deslauriers, G., and C. Leider. 2009. “A Bandlimited Oscillator by Frequency-Domain Synthesis for Virtual-Analog Applications.” Proceedings of the 127th Annual Convention of the Audio Engineering Society. New York: Audio Engineering Society.
  • R. Radhakrishnan, C. Bauer, C. Cheng, and K. Terry. 2007. “Audio Signature Extraction Based on Projections of Spectrograms.” Proceedings of the 2007 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo, Beijing, July 5. New York: Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

Sound Quality Assessment

We routinely perform audio consulting services and corporate-sponsored listening tests of new audio technologies.

Graduate Theses

A vital portion of research efforts in the MuE program is conducted by graduate students in the process of writing their theses.  Please visit the GMuE Thesis Archive for more information.